Brain-on-sugar

T his is an excert from a previous longer article I posted about the many dangers of sugar.

Anyone who doubts the relationship between sugar and mood need only spend an evening with a child who’s consumed a candy bar and a can of soda pop!

Since the brain depends on an even supply of glucose, it’s no surprise that sugar greatly affects us neurologically as our blood sugars soar and plummet with consumption. People who suffer from depression and/or anxiety are especially vulnerable to sugar’s evil power. Sugar impairs the body’s ability to cope with stress. It can lead to difficulties concentrating and fatigue, both of which may be interpreted as signs of anxiety.

A sugar high and subsequent crash can also cause shaking and tension, which can also make anxiety worse.
(www.psychologytoday.com/blog/where-science-meets-the-steps)

Sugar raises the serotonin level in our brain, the “feel-good” chemical. Over time, with continuous increased intake of sugar, the body cuts back on it’s own natural serotonin production and balance, leading to increased cravings for continued sugar. (www.evolvingwellness.com/essay/health-effects-of-sugar-on-your-body-the-bitter-truth). It’s a vicious cycle.

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